Mythos

She wanted to know why everyone was so afraid of her, so I explained about stories and how whoever has the best one wins.

She wanted examples, so I brought my laptop to the barn and read to her all one long afternoon while the universe cooled a little.


From “Coyote Kills a Giant,” a Navajo tale

Suddenly Coyote met a woman who was crawling along on the ground.

“What’s the matter?” he asked.

“I’m starving,” she said, “and too weak to walk. What are you doing with that stick?”

“I’m going to kill the giant with it,” said Coyote, and he asked if she knew where he was hiding.

Feeble as she was, the woman laughed. “You’re already in the giant’s belly.”

 

I came here to drown but the sea, the sea 

 

From “How Thor Fought the Giant Hrungner,” from Norse Stories Retold from the Eddas, by Hamilton Wright Mabie

One bright summer morning, Thor, the God of Thunder, rode out of Asgard far eastward, fighting giants as he went and slaying them with his mighty hammer, Mjolner; but Odin, his beautiful blue mantle shining with stars and his helmet of gold glittering in the clear air, mounted his swift horse Sleipner, and went to Jotunheim, the home of the greatest giant of them all.

 

armistice day pulling blue out of the spectrum

 

From “Birth of Paul Bunyan,” from Maine Tall Tales, retold by S.E. Schlosser

It took five giant storks to deliver Paul to his parents. His first bed was a lumber wagon pulled by a team of horses.

…As a newborn, Paul Bunyan could holler so loud he scared all the fish out of the rivers and streams. All the local frogs started wearing earmuffs so they wouldn’t go deaf when Paul screamed for his breakfast. His parents had to milk two dozen cows morning and night to keep his milk bottle full and his mother had to feed him ten barrels of porridge every two hours to keep his stomach from rumbling and knocking the house down.

…Within a week of his birth, Paul Bunyan could fit into his father’s clothes. After three weeks, Paul rolled around so much during his nap that he destroyed four square miles of prime timberland.

 

you know what just burn all my books (sunset stage left)

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