Someone Else: Rick Daddario

So the other day I pasted three haiku from my blog comments into a document on my computer and noted with satisfaction that yet another round number had been achieved: Rick Daddario had just left his 100th haiku as a comment on this blog. And I know I am going to be celebrating all my amazing commenters in just a couple of days, but I had long planned to feature Rick in a post of his own as soon as he hit 100 haiku (which I had no doubt he would), and this is when it happened, so here goes.

Rick has been commenting here prolifically, entertainingly, thoughtfully, helpfully, philosophically, supportively, and … oh, let’s not forget ramblingly … since back in June, which is almost as long as this blog has been around. There is no such thing as a pointless or boring comment from Rick. (Well, okay, maybe a little pointless. But in a good way. You know, the way surrealism is pointless. But definitely not boring.) It is so much fun having him around. Also, he writes some very cool haiku. (“Cool” is one of Rick’s favorite words.)

I’ve scattered just a sampling of my favorites of Rick’s ku down below, rambling all over the page in a way I hope Rick can relate to. Also, I’ve tried to link whenever possible to the original post that Rick was referring to, because a lot of the connections he makes between my ku and ideas and his are really interesting.

I hope you go check out Rick’s own blog, 19 Planets, where he mostly features his fascinating art (which I appreciate but can’t say much intelligent about because I am woefully ignorant about visual art), lots of which has words on it (I really appreciate that part). He also has some cool audience-participation activities on his site, including the great ku-me and the brand-new ku-on.

(By the way, there are several other people who have left me tons of ku in my comments. Rest assured, their turns are coming.)

Okay. Without further ado, heeeeeeeeeere’s Rick.

_______________

breath count
slowing the wings
of a butterfly

one Buddha
a perfect circle
on the road

 

muddy hand
against the wall
a street poet

 

wet feet
in the water
a dance

 

butterfly breeze
the flapping of lace
curtains

 

the shadow
around this keyhole
a locked door

 

the rain stops
outside my window
the crickets

 

 

wild life
the dance floor
a beehive

 

 

ku-me your ku
across a red dragonfly
splattering mud

 

carving the damp soil
taking away the spatter
yellow mud dauber

 

 

wet ink
on her shoulder
red dragonfly

 

crickets tonight
the passing rain clouds
have left music

 

fireflies
above the creek
a roadway

 

summer tea
the temperature
of moonlight

 

bed bound
in the tree house
a nestling

 

dandelion fluff
the last mouthful
of summer wine

 

 

lost ticket
the journey begins
now

 

big moon
the sky has become small
in my old age

 

a crash
of fallen leaves
red

 

 

 

groggy mind ~
this mountain veil
of volcanic haze

 

white birch
hidden in the snow
exclamation point

 

 

around in a circle
voices back and forth
a round in a circle

 

midnight
the stars so sharp
my eyes ache

 

 

upside down can
the garbage truck moves on
life

 

back eddy
this slow current
of childhood

 

 

the light tink
of rain in the gutter
storm break

 

 

constellations ~
each snowflake
in perfect place

 

the Milky way
a sprinkle of salt
in ink

 

the milky way
laughing so hard tonight
it comes out my nose

 

night blossom
beyond this dark tunnel
the moon

 

frog blossom
ripples in the pond
leave a moon

 

more moon
through avocado leaves
a soft glow

July 19: An Invitation

This past weekend Matt Morden of Morden Haiku — a wonderful haiku poet with a wonderful site that contains not only his haiku but a very extensive links section that has been invaluable to me as I flounder around learning about this form — published his 1000th post. And he did something really cool for it — he invited his readers to send in their haiku and published them.

Well … I am not Matt Morden, more’s the pity, and I am nowhere near 1000 posts … but I am coming up on my 200th. (This Saturday, the 24th July.) And I would love to do the same thing. So many (well, probably all) of my commenters are also wonderful haiku poets and this blog could certainly use a respite from my haiku.

I think I’ll use the same constraint he did — if you have commented here, you are welcome to send me a haiku (or two! why not?) via email this week (to mlallen.69 at gmail.com) and I will publish them all for my 200th post. (If you haven’t commented yet and you’d like to get in on the action, just comment this week.)

*

an invitation
haiku fly through the air
to mingle together