March 15: Glitter (Haibun)

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Glitter becomes you:

inspired, you spread a thin layer

of glue on arms and other rounded parts,

and upturn upon them the elegant jar of gold dust,

rapturously letting it describe and delimit, as it descends,

your ghostly form, previously so vague, and white, and un-wish-for-able.

You say, Get a load of this!, making muscles, inclining to accentuate curves,

giddy with the blindness you can see that you’re inflicting.

Startled, I stare, grown tired of selflessness,

wanting to own everything you possess;

I grasp your flesh, sweeping off grit in showers

of electric sparks, gravity stripping you once more bare:

grains of wheat, pearls of rice, gratings of savory cheese,

and you, goddess, just you now, and the memory of

glitter.

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stars falling
more and more
I wonder why

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First published in Contemporary Haibun Online 7:1, April 2011

July 18: 1-2: The Techniques of the Paradox and the Improbable World

(See this post for an explanation of what’s going on here.)

Jane:

The Technique of the Paradox:

“One of the aims of playing with haiku is to confuse the reader just enough to attract interest. Using a paradox will engage interest and give the reader much to think about. Again, one cannot use nonsense but has to construct a true (connected to reality) paradox. …

climbing the temple hill
leg muscles tighten
in our throats”

The Technique of The Improbable World:

“This is very close to paradox … an old Japanese tool which is often used to make the poet sound simple and child-like. Often it demonstrates a distorted view of science – one we ‘know’ is not true, but always has the possibility of being true (as in quantum physics).

evening wind
colors of the day
blown away


or


waiting room
a patch of sunlight
wears out the chairs”

– Jane Reichhold, Haiku Techniques

*

Me:

one blue egg
the shape of a bird
in my hand

dizziness
clutching my pen
to keep from falling