favourite*

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Haiku New Zealand asked me a while back to write up a list of my favorite haiku for their web site, which I agreed to do even though I thought it would be very hard. I was wrong. I won’t say any more about that because I say it over at Haiku New Zealand, so check it out.

So now I’m curious about what other people’s favorite haiku are. Do you have any? Do you think it would be hard to decide on some? What do you think of my choices? What are you having for lunch? Comment below.

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*One of my favorite things about this entire project was having my bland American spelling of “favorite” corrected to make it more New Zealand-y.

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(static)

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static; interference; trying; to; tell; you

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(Bones 1)

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This haiku was born out of sheer cussedness. I got irritated with everyone saying it wasn’t a good idea to put semicolons in haiku. I got irritated with everyone being down on semicolons in general. What does everyone know, anyway? I decided to write a bunch of haiku with semicolons in them and make everyone admit how great they were.

It turns out that the reason everyone says it’s a bad idea to put semicolons in haiku is that it really doesn’t usually work well at all to put semicolons in haiku. So my defiant experiment was largely a failure. Except for this one. I kind of like this one. And it has five semicolons in it. In case you hadn’t counted.

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(gunshot)

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summer night
a gunshot
interrupts the heat

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Presence 47

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I grew up in Connecticut, which is a very small state. No place in Connecticut is more than a couple of hours away from anyplace else. I lived about forty-five minutes from Newtown. It was down the road. Every place in Connecticut is down the road from everyplace else. Most of Connecticut is a patchwork of small towns more or less like Newtown, all butting comfortably up against each other, breathing each other’s air, gossiping comfortably about each other. The towns are all old and comfortable in their own skin. They’re real places, not in-between places; organic places, not manufactured places. I was a child in one of those towns. I’ve never felt so safe since.

halfway through Advent
the latest explanation
for evil

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